Past Events & Media Archive

Click on past event listings to see more information about each event, including summaries of lectures, conference programmes, and photos, as well as audio or video recordings.


ONLINE BOOK LAUNCH: Architectures of Emergency: Heritage, Displacement and Catastrophe

ONLINE BOOK LAUNCH: Architectures of Emergency: Heritage, Displacement and Catastrophe

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

14 October 2021 17:00 to 18:30

A BIAA-I.B.Tauris Series Joint Online Book Launch with Eray Çaylı (London School of Economics and Political Science), Pınar Aykaç (Middle East Technical University) and Sevcan Ercan (Istanbul Medeniyet University).

Tuesday 14 October 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Challenging existing political analyses of the state of emergency in Turkey, this volume argues that such states are not merely predetermined by policy and legislation but are produced, regulated, distributed and contested through the built environment in both embodied and symbolic ways. Contributors use empirical critical-spatial research carried out in Turkey over the past decade, exploring discourses and practices of heritage conservation, processes of displacement and imaginaries and measures associated with disasters. Contributing to the broader literature on the related concepts of exception, risk, crisis and uncertainty, the book discusses the ways in which these phenomena shape and are shaped by the built environment, and provides context-specific empirical substance to this discussion by focusing on contemporary Turkey. In so doing, it offers nuanced insight into the debate around emergency as well as into recent urban-architectural affairs in Turkey.

Find out more and preorder Architectures of Emergency in Turkey: Heritage, Displacement and Catastrophe edited by Eray Çaylı, Pınar Aykaç and Sevcan Ercan via Bloomsbury.

Keywords: I.B. Tauris; Book Launch; Turkey; Politics; Heritage; Displacement; Catastrophe

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Late Ottoman Period Libya in the Age of Reforms

Late Ottoman Period Libya in the Age of Reforms

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

30 September 2021 19:00 to 21:00

A British Institute at Ankara-Society of Libyan Studies Joint Online Lecture by Odile Moreau

Thursday 30 September 2021 | 17:00-19:00 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-21:00 (Ankara UTC+3)

This lecture intends to shed light on the interrelationships between the provinces that today constitute “Libya” and the Ottoman Empire as they developed during the late Ottoman period, in the Age of Reforms, after the promotion of the Tanzîmât, from 1835 to 1912. Particular attention will be paid to the reframing and the evolution of Ottoman–“Libyan” relationships and interactions at the time of the “Question d’Orient” (Eastern Question).

Keywords: Libya, Ottoman Empire, Reform

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ONLINE BOOK LAUNCH: Police Restructuring in Turkey: A Feminist-Materialist Critique

ONLINE BOOK LAUNCH: Police Restructuring in Turkey: A Feminist-Materialist Critique

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

23 September 2021 17:00 to 18:30

A BIAA-I.B.Tauris Series Joint Online Book Launch with Funda Hülagü (University of Marburg), chaired by Ceren Lord (Oxford University).

Thursday 23 September 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Funda Hülagü asks how the supposedly liberalizing project of police reform in Turkey has become central to Justice and Development Party’s increasingly authoritarian governance. Engaging state theory and a gender analytical perspective, Hülagü will trace the implementation of security sector reform in Turkey, showing how various agents, including liberal policy-makers, Turkish police and the feminist movement in Turkey have contributed to and resisted growing police powers.

Find out more and purchase Police Reform in Turkey: Human Security, Gender and State Violence under Erdoğan by Funda Hülagü via Bloomsbury.

Keywords: I.B. Tauris; Book Launch; Turkey; Police Reform; State Theory; Feminism

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Breaking Continuity? Site Formation and Temporal Depth at Çatalhöyük and Tell Sabi Abyad

Breaking Continuity? Site Formation and Temporal Depth at Çatalhöyük and Tell Sabi Abyad

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

14 September 2021 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Jo-Hannah Plug (University of Liverpool).

Tuesday 14th September 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Spatial continuity of the house is often seen as crucial in providing temporal depth for the Neolithic societies of southwest Asia. While an emphasis on the creation of such continuities is evinced at densely agglomerated sites, other sites show dispersal and frequent relocation of habitation. Superficially, Çatalhöyük (Turkey) and Tell Sabi Abyad (Syria) appear to be at either end of this spectrum. The purpose of this seminar is to compare aspects of the archaeological evidence from the two sites, and in doing so to understand the different and similar ways in which site formation and social continuity were achieved. In particular, the presence of breaks in spatial continuities – an often overlooked aspect of site formation – and its implications are discussed.

Keywords: Anatolian Studies; Archaeology; Neolithic; Domestic; House;

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Secular Migration from Turkey to the UK

Secular Migration from Turkey to the UK

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

29 July 2021 19:00 to 20:30

A BIAA Online Lecture with Umut Parmaksız (British Institute at Ankara) and Discussant: Besim Can Zırh (Middle East Technical University)

Thursday 29th July 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

In the last two decades, growing social conservativism and certain government policies have been points of grievance amongst a large part of Turkish society. This growing dissatisfaction with the politics of Turkey can in turn be understood to have caused a flow of migrants, mostly from middle class, professional, secular backgrounds with high social and cultural capital, from Turkey into various European countries, including the UK. This talk, drawing on semi-structured interviews, will examine the experiences and motivations of secular Turkish citizens who have migrated from Turkey to the UK in light of this social, political and cultural transformation. Parmaksız argues that an important motivation for migration has been a reaction to successive Turkish governments’ efforts to deepen and extend the reach of, what he calls, the Islamonormative social and cultural order of Turkey.

Keywords: Turkey; UK; Politics; Migration; Sociology

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ONLINE PANEL: Changing Energy and Geopolitics in the Mediterranean

ONLINE PANEL: Changing Energy and Geopolitics in the Mediterranean

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

22 July 2021 17:00 to 18:30

A BIAA Online Panel with Fiona Mullen (Sapienta Economics), Gabriel Mitchell (Mitvim – the Israeli Institute for Regional Foreign Policies) and Mehmet Öğütçü (Global Resources Partnership), with Chair: David Logan (BIAA Vice-President)

Thursday 22nd July 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Turkey’s Mediterranean policy has been framed in large measure by the ‘Blue Homeland’ doctrine, driven by its growing energy deficit and a desire for greater geopolitical influence in the region. Meanwhile, Egypt, Israel, Greece, Lebanon and Cyprus, led by their own economic and geopolitical drivers, have developed a common strategy to counter Turkey. The panel will discuss how increasing tensions over offshore resources and freedom of navigation, together with regional challenges such as migration and terrorism, impact on energy and geopolitics in the East Mediterranean.

Keywords: Energy; Turkey; Mediterranean; Geopolitics

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The Rock Inscriptions, Graffiti and Crosses from Quarry GO3C at Göktepe

The Rock Inscriptions, Graffiti and Crosses from Quarry GO3C at Göktepe

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

20 July 2021 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Paweł Nowakowski and Dagmara Wielgosz-Rondolino (University of Warsaw).

Tuesday 20th July 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

This talk will present epigraphical finds from Quarry GO3C, one of the marble quarries at Göktepe near Muğla, recorded during a geo-archaeological survey in 2014. This study was part of the project Marmora Asiatica, financed by the National Science Centre of the Republic of Poland (grant agreement number 2012/07/E/HS3/03971), and supported by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the Republic of Turkey and the General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration of the Republic of Turkey (MTA). A dossier of both already known and newly recorded rock inscriptions and textual and pictorial graffiti (prominently including crosses, an invocation of Saint George, and an ownership inscription) were examined, which throw new light on the history of the quarry.

Keywords: Anatolian Studies; Archaeology; Quarry; Epigraphy; Graffiti

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Revisiting Mihri Hanım (1885-1954): A Woman Painter in the late Ottoman Empire

Revisiting Mihri Hanım (1885-1954): A Woman Painter in the late Ottoman Empire

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

24 June 2021 19:00 to 20:30

A BIAA Online Lecture by Gizem Tongo (British Institute at Ankara) and Discussant: Ahmet Ersoy (Boğaziçi University).

Thursday 24th June 2021 | 17:00-19:00 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-21:00 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Perhaps no painter of the late Ottoman Empire left more of a mark on women’s art and art education than Mihri Hanım (1885-1954). Born in Istanbul in 1885, Mihri was one of the most technically accomplished portraitists of her time, producing vivid and richly coloured portraits of individuals both within and beyond her elite circle that suggest her often female sitters’ agency. Having been instrumental in the foundation of the Academy of Fine Arts in Istanbul (1914), she also served as its first woman director and a painting instructor during the First World War and the Armistice Period. This talk, drawing on contemporary material from the period (art reviews, interviews, archival documents, and artworks), focuses on her artistic production and active role in the Istanbul art world during the final decade of the Ottoman Empire and explores the reasons—political or otherwise—behind the previous relative neglect of her work in art-historical discourse and museum practice and her recent reinstatement and high profile in Turkish cultural memory.

Keywords: Art; Art History; Ottoman; Istanbul; Academy of Fine Arts

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Frankish Gravestones in the Eastern Aegean from the Medieval Period

Frankish Gravestones in the Eastern Aegean from the Medieval Period

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

15 June 2021 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Ergün Laflı (​Dokuz Eylül University) and Maurizio Buora (Società Friuliana di Archeologia).

Tuesday 15th June 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

This seminar presents and discusses mainly four Latin tombstones relating to Italian residents of medieval Ephesus that have been recovered from properties on the terrace of Ayasuluk (Selçuk). Two of them, dating from the late fourteenth century, were originally published in 1937, while the other two, from the mid-fifteenth century, came to light more recently in January 2017. Research on the tombstones was carried out with the assistance of Denys Pringle (Cardiff University).

Keywords: Anatolian Studies; Ephesus; Selçuk; Medieval; Latin; Tombstones

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Public Perceptions of the Other's Heritage: Ottoman Heritage in Greece

Public Perceptions of the Other's Heritage: Ottoman Heritage in Greece

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

08 June 2021 19:00 to 20:30

A BIAA Online Lecture with Hakan Tarhan (IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca).

Tuesday 8th June 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

One of the most common practices among nation-states is using the past and cultural heritage as a nation-building tool, developing national discourses that glorify a shared and owned national heritage while disregarding the others' heritage. Greece underwent this process by creating a discourse of uniting modern Greek identity with the Ancient Greek Civilisation and the Byzantine Empire. Yet, ignoring its Ottoman past eventually resulted in the denial, neglect, and demolition of Greece's Ottoman heritage. This talk will discuss the public perceptions of both state and people towards Ottoman heritage in Greece, analyse how it is being treated today, and to what extent it has been incorporated into the daily lives and personal identities of its contemporary communities.

Keywords: Cultural Heritage; Heritage; Greek; Byzantine; Ottoman; Contemporary Perception

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Subterranean Hagia Sophia: Revealing the Waters below Hagia Sophia

Subterranean Hagia Sophia: Revealing the Waters below Hagia Sophia

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

01 June 2021 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Online Lecture by Çiğdem Özkan Aygün (İstanbul Technical University), and Discussant: James Crow (University of Edinburgh).

Tuesday 1st June 2021 | 17:00-19:00 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-21:00 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Since 2005, Çiğdem Özkan Aygün has directed the interdisciplinary survey of subterranean remains in the area of Hagia Sophia, also supported by speleologists, professional photographers and divers. During this talk, Çiğdem will explain the subterranean structures and their relation to the water supply system, present their 3D models and show a short documentary. Most of the finds were new to scholarship and unexpectedly rich and informative about the history and the construction techniques of the structures. They have opened a door into the monument's unexplored relation with water management. This survey has proven that the area of Hagia Sophia was strategic in water supply distribution over the first hill of the city where the ancient water supply line ended. Further exploration beneath the Hippodrome and Topkapı Palace area revealed connections in the water supply.

Keywords: Survey; Hagia Sophia; Turkey; Istanbul; Water Management

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The Martyrdom of Konon of Bidana: How the Patron of the Isaurians was Made

The Martyrdom of Konon of Bidana: How the Patron of the Isaurians was Made

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

11 May 2021 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Philipp Pilhofer (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin).

Tuesday 11th May 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

This seminar focuses on a local martyr from a village close to Isaura in the Taurus mountains: Konon of Bidana. The Martyrdom of Konon is a late antique Greek hagiographical text centred on this rural saint. Philipp Philhofer will show how the martyr text presents Konon as an unpretentious local man, who steps up to become a thaumaturge and the Christian apostle of the region. The epigraphical and archaeological remains show that the regional population respected Konon as their local patron.

Keywords: Turkey; Greek; Literaure; Isaura; Konon; Epigraphy

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The Abandoned 19th-20th c. Rural Architectural Heritage of Ayvalık

The Abandoned 19th-20th c. Rural Architectural Heritage of Ayvalık

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

04 May 2021 19:00 to 20:30

A BIAA Online Lecture with Hasan Sercan Sağlam (Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations - ANAMED).

Tuesday 4th May 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

This lecture focuses on the forgotten rural buildings that remained from the former Greek community of Ayvalık, which thrived during the late Ottoman period. However, its residents needed to emigrate as a result of the mandatory population exchange between Greece and Turkey in 1923 after the Turkish War of Independence. Those monuments include not only the renowned monasteries but also chapels, windmills, terraces of wheat agriculture, salt pans and barns around settlement centres as well as on the uninhabited islands. This intertwined agricultural, industrial and sacred landscape of Ayvalık was neither covered by the national legislation nor academic researches up to the present. Therefore, they eventually turned into distant ruin sites that are now at risk due to decay and vandalism.

Keywords: Heritage; Architecture; Rural; Greek; Ottoman; Ayvalık

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ONLINE LECTURE: Bodies, Bronze, and Başur: What the dead have to say about it

ONLINE LECTURE: Bodies, Bronze, and Başur: What the dead have to say about it

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom

26 April 2021 17:00 to 18:30

A BIAA Online Lecture by Brenna Hassett (Institute of Archaeology, UCL)

Monday 26th April 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Physical anthropology at the site of Başur Höyük near modern-day Siirt in the Upper Tigris region allows fascinating insights into the Mesopotamian sphere of influence at the crux of the transition to the 3rd millennium BCE. In the interregnum between waves of southern Mesopotamian influence, the rich retainer burials and mass death pit of the Early Bronze Age cemetery at Başur Höyük provide impressive testimony to the ways in which the dead can be used to communicate new ideas of social connection – and disconnection.

Keywords: Archaeology; Physical Anthropology; Başur Höyük; Tigris; Mesopotamia

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ONLINE PANEL: The Turkey – UK – USA relationship in the Biden Presidency

ONLINE PANEL: The Turkey – UK – USA relationship in the Biden Presidency

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom

15 April 2021 17:00 to 19:00

A BIAA Online Panel with Ünal Çevikoz (Turkish Ambassador to the UK 2010-2014), Nicholas Danforth (Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy), John Goulden (former UK Ambassador to Turkey and permanent representative to NATO), Ziya Meral (Royal United Services Institute), and Chair: David Logan (BIAA Vice-President).

Thursday 15th April 2021 | 17:00-19:00 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-21:00 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

US-Turkey relations will no longer be distorted by mutual admiration between Presidents Trump and Erdoğan. How will that affect the major differences between them? Biden and Brexit will impact the UK’s relationship with both the US and Turkey. How will relations between the three countries re-triangulate?

Keywords: UK; Turkey; USA; Diplomacy; Presidency; Politics

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Decoding the Milesian Agro-Pastoral Economy from Above: Remote Sensing and Metrology

Decoding the Milesian Agro-Pastoral Economy from Above: Remote Sensing and Metrology

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

30 March 2021 17:00 to 17:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Toby Wilkinson (Catalan Institute of Classical Archaeology - ICAC) and Anja Slawisch (University of Edinburgh).

Tuesday 30th March 2021 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Examination of a number of satellite and aerial images of the Milesian peninsula has allowed the mapping of a large number of apparently ancient linear features across the landscape. These are here interpreted, for the most part, as relics of agro-economic field systems, of unknown date, but most plausibly established during the Archaic, Hellenistic or late antique periods, and perhaps used for centuries after, before the economic decline of the region in the second millennium AD. While earlier survey work has noted the existence of terracing and rural divisions at certain points in the landscape, the new remote-sensing data have provided an unprecedented large-scale insight into the extent and variety of forms of division. In addition to documenting the stripping of macquis overgrowth by modern farming practices, which has, on the one hand, exposed these ancient landscapes but also, on the other, poses a threat to their preservation. The extent of the linear features suggests a high degree of land use on the peninsula at certain points in the past. Further investigation of these important features has the potential to provide critical insights into the economic history of rural and urban Miletos over the last 2,000 to 5,000 years.

Keywords: Milesian; Agriculture; Economy; Archaeology; Remote Sensing; Metrology

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British-Turkish Relations After Brexit

British-Turkish Relations After Brexit

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom

09 March 2021 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Online Lecture by Dominick Chilcott (British Ambassador to Turkey)

Tuesday 9th March 2021 | 16:00-17:30 (London UTC) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

The strategic context of the UK's relations with Turkey changed at the end of the Cold War in 1989 and again when the UK left the EU last year. After Brexit, the UK could no longer act as Turkey's most sympathetic friend within the EU and enjoy privileged access in return in Ankara. Sir Dominick asks what Britain's foreign policy priorities are likely to be now and how Turkey fits into this changed picture. Do the UK and Turkey still have enough in common to forge a genuine partnership that transcends transactional cooperation? What are the opportunities for the relationship with Turkey now that the UK is outside the EU? Does the UK's new relationship with the EU provide a model for Turkey?  To what extent does the fact that Turkey and Britain are two former imperial powers, situated like the EU's north-west and south-east bookends, constitute common ground on which to build closer relations? And what role does geography play in determining the relationship between these two countries. Sir Dominick will attempt to provide answers to all these questions and more.

Keywords: UK; Turkey; Diplomacy; Brexit

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Feminist Art in the Middle East and Turkey

Feminist Art in the Middle East and Turkey

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom

04 March 2021 19:00 to 20:30

A BIAA-CBRL Joint Online Lecture by Ceren Özpınar (University of Brighton), Charlotte Bank (University of Geneva), and Tina Sherwell (Birzeit University) with Chair: Toufic Haddad (CBRL).

Thursday 4th March 2021 | 16:00-17:30 (London UTC) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

This lecture, co-hosted by the British Institute at Ankara and the Council for British Research in the Levant (CBRL), will showcase the latest debates and scholarship on modern and contemporary feminist art practices and histories from the Middle East and Turkey. 

Our panellists will share their perspectives on feminist art in Turkey, Syria and Palestine. Dr Ceren Özpınar will examine how the history of feminist art in Turkey has been commonly told and why that should be challenged; Dr Charlotte Bank will discuss feminist approaches in works by Syrian women artists and how they have been a vehicle for social change; Dr Tina Sherwell will highlight the work of Palestinian women artists. The webinar will be chaired by Toufic Haddad, Director of CBRL’s Kenyon Institute in Jerusalem.

Keywords: Art; Feminism; Turkey; Middle East

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Rural Hinterlands of the Black Sea during the Fourth Century BCE

Rural Hinterlands of the Black Sea during the Fourth Century BCE

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

22 February 2021 16:00 to 17:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Jane Rempel (University of Sheffield) and Owen Doonan (California State University Northridge).

Monday 22nd February 2021 | 16:00-17:30 (London UTC) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

This seminar takes a holistic approach to the data for rural hinterlands in the Black Sea region in the fourth century BCE, in order to reveal pan-Black Sea patterning, importantly including the southern coast and the territory of ancient Sinope. During a period of dynamic mobility and prosperity, the rural hinterlands of Greek settlements around the Black Sea expanded in ways that demonstrate significant regional commonalities. These included increased settlement, intensified agricultural infrastructure, new connections via road and path networks, and the inclusion of dependent territories beyond the traditional chora. Decisions to expand rural territory and intensify agricultural production were taken at the local level, but this patterning demonstrates that such developments were also a response to the dynamics of Black Sea economic and political networks. The associated increased density of occupation and connectivity in these rural hinterlands made them key facilitators of social networks, creating stronger ties between Greek settlements and other local communities, and ultimately enmeshing a more diverse group of people within Black Sea networks.

Keywords: Black Sea; Rural; Hinterlands; Agriculture; Archaeology

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Representing the Hidden Heritages of the Greek Communities of Istanbul

Representing the Hidden Heritages of the Greek Communities of Istanbul

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom

15 December 2020 16:00 to 17:30

A BIAA Online Lecture by Gönül Bozoğlu (Newcastle University)

Discussant: Ayhan Kaya (Bilgi University)

Tuesday 15th December 2020 | 16:00-17:30 (London UTC) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

The minority Greek (‘Rum’) communities of Istanbul have endured hardships including 20th-century developments such as the Wealth Tax, the 1955 Pogrom (Septemvriana), and forced displacement. Now, the Rum population in Istanbul is drastically reduced but still vibrant, and there are diaspora communities in Greece – particularly Athens. The communities have little recognition in official heritage and are now ageing, with the consequent risk of a loss of heritage and memory. In her ethnographic research, Gönül Bozoğlu seeks to understand Rum memory cultures and to remediate this through a digital memory map and film, valorising personal, affective, and individual understandings of heritage, building a community resource, and creating platforms to promote wider historical awareness of this little-known history.

Keywords: Culture; Greek; Rum; Istanbul

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Caracalla and the Divine: Emperor Worship and Representation in Roman Asia Minor

Caracalla and the Divine: Emperor Worship and Representation in Roman Asia Minor

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

01 December 2020 16:00 to 17:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Dario Calomino (Warwick University).

Tuesday 1st December 2020 | 16:00-17:30 (London UTC) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

This talk explores the visual language adopted in the cities of Asia Minor to represent the emperor Caracalla in the years 214–216, which he spent travelling between the Anatolian region, Egypt and the Near East. It discusses the imagery designed to express Caracalla's relation with the divine through the overlapping representations of the emperor as a devotee and peer of the gods, and as a divine being. The talk focuses in particular on the imagery introduced in Asia Minor to represent the worship of the living Roman emperor and his cult-image, providing insights into the creation of extraordinary visual patterns that remained unique to the reign of Caracalla.

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Collective, Political and Cultural Memory: Foundation and Termination Rituals at Toprakhisar Höyük

Collective, Political and Cultural Memory: Foundation and Termination Rituals at Toprakhisar Höyük

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

17 November 2020 16:00 to 17:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Murat Akar (Hatay Mustafa Kemal University).

Tuesday 17th November 2020 | 16:00-17:30 (London UTC) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Constructing and deconstructing public spaces in second-millennium BC Anatolia, the Near East and the Levant was not only a collaborative physical act but also involved deeply embodied ritual symbolism. This symbolism is materialised in the practice of conducting public foundation and termination rituals that unified individual memories in space and time, transforming the physical act into a collective memory: a process that contributed to the formation of political and cultural memory. The recent rescue excavations conducted by the Hatay Archaeological Museum at the hinterland site of Toprakhisar Höyük in Altınözü (in the foothills above the Amuq valley) add to the understanding of the practice of foundation and termination rituals during the Middle Bronze Age and how these moments may have contributed to the political and cultural memory of a rural community living away from the centre. The practice of foundation/termination rituals is archaeologically documented by caches of artefacts from votive contexts stratigraphically linked to the construction and termination of a Middle Bronze Age administrative structure.

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A Desolate Landscape? Mobility and Interaction in the Chora of Klazomenai during the Early Iron Age

A Desolate Landscape? Mobility and Interaction in the Chora of Klazomenai during the Early Iron Age

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

20 October 2020 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Elif Koparal (Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University) and Rik Vaessen (RAAP Archaeological Consultancy).

Tuesday 20th October 2020 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Over the past two decades or so, excavations at Klazomenai have unearthed a wealth of information about the Early Iron Age, showing it to have been a thriving settlement at this time. Accordingly, it is intriguing that systematic surveys in the chora of Klazomenai have turned up very few sites that can be dated to this period. In this contribution, we discuss the implications of this discrepancy between the excavation data and the survey data in terms of the relationship between the settlement and its surrounding countryside. We argue that the lack of identified sites in the chora does not mean a lack of movement or that Klazomenai was an isolated spot in an otherwise desolate landscape. Furthermore, we discuss briefly how the developments that took place during the Early Iron Age ultimately led to the emergence of the polis at the beginning of the Archaic period. Our principal aim is to highlight the importance of the survey data, not only in terms of exploring the web of relations in which Klazomenai was tangled during the Early Iron Age, but also for highlighting in more detail the diversities that existed in ancient Ionia.
 

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Re-thinking the Role of Turkey’s Ulema

Re-thinking the Role of Turkey’s Ulema

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom.

29 September 2020 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Online Lecture by Ceren Lord (University of Oxford)

Discussant: Umut Azak (Istanbul Okan University)

This lecture will examine the evolution of the role of the Turkish ulema (Muslim clerics), housed within the Presidency of Religious Affairs (Diyanet İşleri Başkanlığı, Diyanet). Established in 1924, the Diyanet is the country’s chief Islamic authority with a monopoly on overseeing Muslim religious life. Within Turkish studies, the Diyanet has been largely viewed as an apparatus of the ostensibly ‘secular Kemalist’ state, and more recently, as an ideological tool of the AKP. Broader studies of Islamic authority have also overlooked the Diyanet, regarding it as marginal and passive. In contrast, this lecture will trace lines of continuity between the Ottoman ulama and the Diyanet, underlining its agency in struggling for the expansion of its role and in pursuing Islamisation.

Keywords: Religion; Diyanet; Turkey

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Occupied Istanbul: Urban Politics, Culture, and Society, 1918-1923

Occupied Istanbul: Urban Politics, Culture, and Society, 1918-1923

Istanbul | Boğaziçi University

25 - 27 September 2020, 18:00 - 18:00

At 9.40 a.m. on 16 March 1920, Andrew Ryan of the British high commission presented the Ottoman prime minister, Salih Hulusi Paşa, with a note informing him that the Allies had declared martial law and occupied Istanbul. Earlier in the morning, British, French, and Italian troops, present in the city since November 1918, had conducted a series of arrests of high profile former and serving Ottoman officials and officers and taken control of multiple government ministries. Allied forces would not depart from Istanbul until 6 October 1923.

The centenary of the official occupation presents a useful moment in which to promote a more comprehensive study of the politics, culture, and society of Istanbul during the period. Despite the wealth of relevant multi-national archival holdings available, the occupation has been largely ignored in public memory and academic writing in the former occupying powers and is often marginalised in the Anatolian-focused history of the War of Independence in Turkey. The few English-language publications to date have focused on international diplomacy around the status of Istanbul while Turkish literature has concentrated on nationalist responses to the occupation, leaving developments in the city itself largely unexplored.

The work of several early career scholars is now making up for this historiographical neglect, and it is hoped that the occupation’s centenary will prompt academics with expertise in the adjacent periods of late Ottoman and early Republican history to extend their research to the years 1918-1923.

Keywords: Istanbul, Occupation, History

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The Political Geography of Hartapu’s Kingdom

The Political Geography of Hartapu’s Kingdom

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

22 September 2020 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar by Michele Massa (University of Chicago), with panelists Christoph Bachhuber, Fatma Şahin, Hüseyin Erpehlivan, James Osborne and Anthony J. Lauricella.

Tuesday 22nd September 2020 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

The recent discovery of the Türkmen-Karahöyük megasite and the associated Luwian inscription by ‘Great King Hartapu’ have raised questions regarding our knowledge of the political geography of southern-central Anatolia. While traditionally attributed to the end of the Hittite Empire, Hartapu’s kingdom can now be firmly dated to the Middle Iron Age on philological grounds. This makes it broadly contemporary with the expanding Phrygian kingdom on one side, the Neo-Assyrian Empire on the other, and a constellation of smaller principalities known as Tabal. The aim of the seminar is to employ an integrated geographical, archaeological and philological analysis to define the political borders of Hartapu’s kingdom, and to understand its geopolitical role and relevance in the mid-late 8th century BCE.

Keywords: Anatolian Studies; Urbanism; Early State Formation; Konya; Karaman

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The City of Hartapu: Results of the Türkmen-Karahöyük Intensive Survey Project

The City of Hartapu: Results of the Türkmen-Karahöyük Intensive Survey Project

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

25 August 2020 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with James F. Osborne, (co-authors Michele Massa, Fatma Şahin, Hüseyin Erpehlivan and Christoph Bachhuber). 

Tuesday 25th August 2020 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Summary of Event:

Working in collaboration with the Konya Regional Archaeological Survey Project (KRASP), in 2019 the Türkmen-Karahöyük Intensive Survey Project began a high-resolution survey of Türkmen-Karahöyük, the largest Bronze-Iron Age mound in the Konya Plain. Although the survey is still ongoing, prompt publication of preliminary results was necessary following two exciting discoveries: first, that the site may have been as large as 125 ha or more during the Late Bronze and Iron Ages, and second, an eighth century Hieroglyphic Luwian inscription authored by "Great King Hartapu," long known from the enigmatic monuments of Kızıldağ and Karadağ. Together these findings suggest that Türkmen-Karahöyük was Hartapu’s capital city and that his kingdom was one of the most significant geopolitical actors in Anatolia at the time. 

Keywords: Anatolian Studies; Hartapu; Türkmen-Karahöyük; Survey

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New Insights at Aphrodisias: Recent Research and Discoveries

New Insights at Aphrodisias: Recent Research and Discoveries

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom

28 July 2020 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA-ARIT Online Lecture by R. R. R. Smith (University of Oxford)

Tuesday 28th July 2020 | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | Online

Recent work at Aphrodisias by the New York University-Oxford University team has brought exciting discoveries about the city’s antique and post-antique life and occupation. After a brief introduction to the site, the talk will concentrate on work carried out in four main areas in 2019: (1) the Civil Basilica, (2) the colonnaded park called the Place of Palms, (3) the Tetrapylon Street, and (4) a new project at the House of Kybele, a grand late antique residence close to the city wall in the northeast quarter of the city.

Keywords: Aphrodisias

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Anatolian Studies: Diversity and Inclusivity in Archaeological Research and Publishing

Anatolian Studies: Diversity and Inclusivity in Archaeological Research and Publishing

Online | The seminar will be held via Zoom

21 July 2020 17:00 to 18:30

An Anatolian Studies Virtual Seminar with Chair: Tamar Hodos (University of Bristol), Presenter: Naoíse Mac Sweeney (University of Leicester), and Respondents: Shahina Farid (BIAA and Historic England) and Elif Koparal (Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University).

Tuesday 21st July 2020 | 17:00-18:30 (London UTC+1) | 19:00-20:30 (Ankara UTC+3) | Online

Summary of Event:

Current world events have raised questions about race, diversity, and equality at every level of society. But how much of this applies to the discipline of Anatolian archaeology? Does it still labour beneath the twin legacies of colonialism and nationalism? And has the discipline succeeded in becoming more inclusive over the years? The BIAA’s journal, Anatolian Studies, offers insights into 70 years of disciplinary history, and some of the answers to these questions can be found within its pages. Join Naoíse Mac Sweeney, incoming academic editor of Anatolian Studies, and a panel of discussants for a debate on the past, present, and future of Anatolian archaeology.

Keywords: Anatolian Studies; Diversity; Inclusivity; Archaeology; Research; Publishing

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Recent Discoveries at Sardis: From the Bronze Age until the End of Antiquity

Recent Discoveries at Sardis: From the Bronze Age until the End of Antiquity

Online | The lecture will be held via Zoom

23 June 2020 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA-ARIT Online Lecture by Nick Cahill (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Director of Sardis Excavations)

Sardis was one of the most important ancient cities of western Turkey, the birthplace of coinage, capital of the Lydian king Croesus, and one of the Seven Churches of Asia. In this lecture Nicholas Cahill will share new discoveries, research, and conservation projects of recent years. Among these are new evidence for occupation in the Early Bronze Age, almost a millennium earlier than previously believed; remains of the Palace of Croesus and the capture of Sardis by Cyrus the Great; the largest arch in the Roman world; and information for patronage in the sixth century AD.

Keywords: Sardis; Archaeology; Lydia; Rome

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New Archaeological Evidence from Neoklaudiopolis

New Archaeological Evidence from Neoklaudiopolis

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

02 April 2020 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by Tønnes Bekker-Nielsen (University of Southern Denmark)

The Roman city of Neapolis was founded after the Third Mithradatic War and later renamed Neoklaudiopolis in the emperor's honour. Today, it is known as Vezirköprü. Until 2010, the Roman city was known only through its coins, inscriptions and a few scattered references by ancient writers. As part of a joint Danish-Turkish-German project, an archaeological survey around the modern city of Vezirköprü has provided new insights into the topography of the city, the evolution of its water supply, its place in the road network of northern Anatolia and its civic and religious life. This lecture will present some of the project’s findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of Roman and late Roman Neoklaudiopolis.

Keywords: Neapolis; Rome; Archaeology; Vezirköprü

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Archaeologists at the Trojan walls, meddling between myth and reality?

Archaeologists at the Trojan walls, meddling between myth and reality?

London | UCL Institute of Archaeology, Room G6

26 March 2020 16:15 to 20:00

Troy in Myth and Matter: Panel Debate on Archaeology, Fiction and the Public

Archaeologists at the Trojan walls, meddling between myth and reality?


Archaeology is just one of the many disciplines that have approached the understanding of the site of Troy and the events in its history. In some ways, it occupies an awkward position between myth and the reality of the site. What is the role of archaeology in the modern consumption of Troy? Do archaeologists just look from the sidelines? A panel discussion will explore these issues in a frank and open manner. A panel discussion with Prof. Susan Sherratt, Dr. Naoise Mac Sweeney, Dr. Andrew Shapland, and Dr. Eva Mol.

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Mapping Post-Ottoman Memory

Mapping Post-Ottoman Memory

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

26 February 2020 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA lecture by Jeremy F. Walton (Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity)

Discussant:

Deniz Avcı Hosanlı (Bilkent University)

Summary of Event:

Across central and southeast Europe, Anatolia, and the Levant, architectural restorations increasingly constitute revenants of an Ottoman past and presence that had previously dwindled to obscurity. In this lecture, I examine five sites of post-Ottoman memory: the Hungarian-Turkish Friendship Park near the former fortress of Szigetvár, Hungary; Banja Luka's Ferhadija Mosque; Maškovičeva Han in Vrana; Croatia, the New Mosque in Thessaloniki, and Dolmabahçe Palace in Istanbul. My aim in doing so is double. First, I account for the emergent discourse of Neo-Ottomanism--a form of what Svetlana Boym describes as "reflective nostalgia"--that stitches these sites together as embodiments of a singular image of the empire. Secondly, I trace the divergent genealogies of each site in order to unsettle the homogenized image of the past that Neo-Ottomanism anoints.

Keywords: Cultural Heritage; architecture; Ottoman; Turkey; Balkans

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Applied Ethnomusicology and Intangible Cultural Heritage

Applied Ethnomusicology and Intangible Cultural Heritage

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

20 February 2020 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by Olcay Muslu Gardner (Hatay Mustafa Kemal University)

Applied ethnomusicology is an approach which uses musical knowledge and understanding in practice to solve concrete social problems through broad and multi-disciplinary partnerships with non/governmental entities, international organizations such as UNESCO (ICH) and the academic and non-academic experts, NGO’s and local communities. These connections are a critical means to sustain endangered musical cultures. Although there have been models which have been used in attempts to prevent the disappearance of cultures and traditions, each case has unique actors and challenges. This seminar is a summary of studies conducted within Turkey between 1998 and 2019. It will show how multidisciplinary methods can be used effectively and efficiently to meet current obstacles and support local practices such as the Şanlıurfa “sıra gecesi”.

Keywords: Music; Cultural Heritage

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‘Why, How and by Whom?’ – The Safeguarding Archaeological Assets of Turkey (SARAT) Project

‘Why, How and by Whom?’ – The Safeguarding Archaeological Assets of Turkey (SARAT) Project

London | Wolfson Room, The British Academy

11 February 2020 18:30 to 21:30

 

Speakers: Dr Lutgarde Vandeput (BIAA Director), Dr Gül Pulhan (SARAT Project Coordinator), Dr Işılay Gürsu (SARAT Cultural Heritage Management Researcher)

On the evening of Tuesday 11th February, the BIAA is hosting an event to share the final results of the Safeguarding Archaeological Assets of Turkey (SARAT) project. This project, led by the BIAA in partnership with Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED) and the International Council of Museums in the UK (ICOM UK), aims to increase knowledge, capacity, and awareness in relation to protecting Turkey’s archaeological assets by implementing four interconnected activities:

  • Developing and running an online course for heritage and other related professionals on ‘Safeguarding and Rescuing Archaeological Assets’;
  • Conducting Turkey’s first nationwide public opinion survey to investigate the relationship between the public and archaeology, and organizing a series of ‘Archaeology in Local Context’ workshops to share the results with local stakeholders;
  • Organising ‘Archaeology Reporting’ workshops for journalists around the country to improve the quality of heritage-related journalism;
  • Undertaking interviews with registered antiquities collectors to raise awareness of the destruction caused by looting archaeological objects.

 

Since 2017, the SARAT project has been funded by the Cultural Protection Fund managed by the British Council in partnership with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sports.  This current phase is coming to an end in March 2020. In this lecture, the results of the 3-year project as well as its potential to serve as a replicable template for similar initiatives will be presented, with a special focus on the results of the unique nationwide public opinion survey.

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Archaeology in Anatolia Symposium

Archaeology in Anatolia Symposium

London | Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, SOAS

10 February 2020 09:30 to 16:30

Summary of Event:

The BIAA, along with the Royal Anthropological Institute, SOAS and the Anglo-Turkish Society, is delighted to announce a one-day symposium on Archaeology in Anatolia.

The aim of this symposium is to explore outstanding recent work in the archaeology and prehistory of Anatolia. Speakers include: Prof. Ian Hodder, Prof. Douglas Baird, Dr Maxime Brami, Dr Lee Clare, Dr Işılay Gürsu, Dr John MacGinnis, and Dr Artemis Papatheodorou.

Pre-booking essential: Adult: £80, Student: £40, RAI Fellow / ATS / BIAA Member: £40 + limited free tickets for SOAS staff & students. Booking is essential.

Join us for a celebration of this rich and varied heritage going back to the dawn of civilisation covering a wide time span from pre-history. Tea / coffee provided on the day. 

For enquiries, please contact: contact@angloturkishsociety.org.uk.

Keywords: Archaeology, prehistory, excavation

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BIAA London Lecture: Conflict and Reconciliation: A Role for Turkish Civil Society Today?

BIAA London Lecture: Conflict and Reconciliation: A Role for Turkish Civil Society Today?

London | Council Room, The British Academy

10 December 2019 18:30 to 20:00

A BIAA London lecture by Dr Leonidas Karakatsanis, former BIAA Assistant Director (2015-2019).

VENUE CHANGE: This lecture will now be held in The British Academy’s Council Room.

For more than a decade after 1999, significant reconciliation efforts emerged amidst the troubled relations between Turkey and its neighbours Greece, Armenia and the Republic of Cyprus. Even the thorny Kurdish issue saw the launch of a short-lived peace process between 2013-2015. In all these processes of rapprochement, civil society actors and initiatives played a significant role in facilitating empathy across the societies and ethnic groups in question. Civil society’s role was important because conflict and mistrust were sustained by painful memories of loss and displacement that usually excluded the pain of the ‘other’.

Today, the positive momentum that such reconciliation efforts achieved appears long gone. Instead, cool relations at best - tensions, live conflict, and war at worst - have returned. Adopting a comparative historical approach, this lecture will evaluate the successes and failures of civil society’s role in promoting rapprochement and reflect on the challenges that Turkish civil society faces in the pursuit of regional peace.

Images:

1) A common prayer for deceased ancestors by Turkish and Greek descendants of families affected by population exchange at the village of Panagitsa in Northern Greece. (Source: Milliyet Newspaper) 

2 and 3) The commemoration of Hrant Dink, an Armenian-Turkish journalist, on the 8th anniversary of his assassination. Osmanbey, Istanbul. Images by Esin.

Keywords: Politics, civil society, reconciliation

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Legitimating Occult Practices of Dubious Orthodoxy: Dream Interpretation

Legitimating Occult Practices of Dubious Orthodoxy: Dream Interpretation

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

04 December 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by İrvin Cemil Schick (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales)

Discussant: Nil Tekgül (Department of Turkish Literature, Bilkent University)

Summary of Event:

The Qur’ān makes clear its opposition to occult practices, and yet, they were and continue to be practiced widely and not by any means as marginal traditions. How can the sharī‘ah’s distaste for divination be reconciled with the latter’s widespread acceptance? This talk offers an answer by reviewing the various means by which occult practices have been legitimated as they appear in extant treatises, focusing in particular on dream interpretation. Many treatises begin with lists of citations from the Qur’ān and the ḥadīths that can be interpreted as sanctioning the practice of oneiromancy; to determine the more subtle means by which such legitimation was accomplished, it is instructive to compare Islamic oneiromancy with its Greek and Jewish antecedents.

 

Keywords: Dreams; Oneiromancy; Islam

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A Regional Perspective on Tarhuntašša and Tabal

A Regional Perspective on Tarhuntašša and Tabal

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

28 November 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by Michele Massa (BIAA) and James Osborne (University of Chicago)

Discussant: Marie-Henriette Gates (Bilkent University)

Summary of Event:

In 2019, the Konya Regional Archaeological Survey Project and the Türkmen-Karahöyük Intensive Survey Project brought to light exciting new evidence about a previously unknown Late Bronze and Iron Age regional centre in the Konya Plain. Türkmen-Karahöyük, one of the largest settlements in pre-Classical Anatolia, is almost certainly the royal seat of King Hartapu, whose Hieroglyphic Luwian inscription found at the site describes his exploits across the country. We further propose that the site might have been an important centre of the elusive kingdom of Tarhuntašša. Here we present the preliminary results of the 2019 intensive survey, the philological analysis of the inscription, as well as an assessment of the socio-political dynamics in the region contemporary with the apogee of Türkmen-Karahöyük.

Keywords: Archaelogy; Konya; Tarhuntašša; Tabal

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George Orwell and Public Archaeology

George Orwell and Public Archaeology

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

12 November 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by Tim Schadla-Hall

Summary of Event:

Archaeologists present the past to wide audiences for a variety of reasons at different times. Archaeologists offer interpretations of the past that may well suit prevailing views, or indeed their own views of the past, but equally their interpretations may be adopted and adapted by others in a way that was never intended by them. This is an attempt through a series of case studies to examine the uses of the past by both individual archaeologists and wider society , in turn asking the question about both the appeal of archaeology and its potential abuse. Neal Ascherson suggested “Archaeology is the handmaiden of nationalism”, and the relationship of archaeology to the state has wider implications than are often considered.

Keywords: Archaeology; Public Archaeology; George Orwell

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Physical Anthropology in Anatolia

Physical Anthropology in Anatolia

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

08 November 2019 09:30 to 17:00

Organised by Benjamin Irvine (BIAA), Yılmaz Selim Erdal (Hacettepe University), and Lutgarde Vandeput (BIAA)

To be held at the BIAA as a joint hosting collaboration between the BIAA and Husbio-L (Hacettepe University)

The Physical Anthropology in Anatolia workshop brings together 12 speakers of Turkish nationality or currently based and conducting research in Turkey to present on a range of topics from the Neolithic to the Byzantine periods. These will include stature, intentional modifications of the skeleton, pathologies and trauma, childhood, dental and oral health, diet, nutrition, and the application of archaeological sciences to physical anthropology, amongst many others.

One of the aims of this workshop is to bring together leading active researchers who are producing current and new information about the humans of Turkey’s rich past. This will have a positive effect in two ways: enabling an intimate to present their original research and ideas, and, secondly, to provide an environment for dynamic and productive discussion and dialogue. Physical anthropology has a long history in Turkish archaeology, and workshops like this will help to ensure that the field continues to grow and advance in the future.

Keywords: Physical anthropology, diet, biology, Anatolia

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2019 Oliver Gurney Memorial Lecture

2019 Oliver Gurney Memorial Lecture

London | Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Senate House North Block (S108), SOAS

30 October 2019 19:00 to 20:30

Professor Mirko Novák (Bern University) will deliver the bi-annual BIAA Oliver Gurney Memorial Lecture on 'Kizzuwatna-Hiyawa-Cilicia: A region at the interface of Anatolia, the Levant and Cyprus in light of the excavations at Sirkeli Höyük'

The ongoing Swiss-Turkish excavations at Sirkeli Höyük, one of the largest Bronze and Iron Age settlements in Cilicia, have shed new light on the cultural history of one of the most fertile regions of modern Turkey. Known in the Bronze Age as Kizzuwatna and in the Iron Age as Hiyawa/Que, its history is characterised by constant fluctuation between independence as a minor kingdom and belonging to one of the great empires of the Near East – namely Mittanni and the Hittite and Assyrian empires. The exploration of Sirkeli Höyük has so far resulted in the astonishing discovery of a large, complex, cityscape which consisted of a bipartite citadel, a vast lower town, an upper town complete with necropolis, a quarry and a water reservoir, as well as a suburb and several extramural workshop areas.

This lecture will trace the eventful cultural history of Cilicia using the example of the ancient site of Sirkeli Höyük.

Please click here for a Video Stream of this lecture kindly provided by SOAS University of London.

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Isauria and the end of the Roman Empire

Isauria and the end of the Roman Empire

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

16 October 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by Hugh Elton (Trent University) and Mark Jackson (Newcastle University)

Discussant: Stephen Mitchell (BIAA)

Summary of Event:

The two lecturers will discuss how the ancient region of Isauria (modern Mersin province) was integrated into the Roman Empire from the fourth century AD onwards. Using archaeological results from BIAA research projects conducted at Alahan and at Kilise Tepe in the Göksu valley, they discuss questions of how well integrated these areas were to the Roman Empire, socially, politically, and economically. The region was particularly well-connected with the Empire in the reign of Zeno (474-491). Dr Elton will first provide an overview, based on his research at Alahan and in the Göksu Valley Survey, followed by Dr Jackson who will zoom in on the excavations at Kilise Tepe where extraordinarily well-preserved houses of the early Byzantine phase provide some of the first excavated evidence of material culture in a domestic rural setting in Isauria. The way that Isauria was lost to Roman control is also discussed.

Keywords: Roman Empire, Isauria, History, Classical Archaeology

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The Mevlevis and their Manuscripts in 13th–14th Century Anatolia

The Mevlevis and their Manuscripts in 13th–14th Century Anatolia

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

03 October 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by Cailah Jackson, Junior Research Fellow, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Discussant: Suzan Yalman, Assistant Professor, Department of Archaeology and History of Art, Koç University.

Summary of Event: Several illuminated Anatolian manuscripts remain from the late thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Many of these feature lavish ornamentation and contain rich historical details concerning the involvement of Mevlevi scribes and patrons. However, this material remains relatively neglected in broader surveys of Islamic art. This talk will partially address this gap in scholarship by discussing the arts of the book in the context of early Mevlevi activities in Anatolia. These manuscripts, all works by Jalal al-Din Rumi (d. 1273) and his son Sultan Walad (d. 1312), represent the earliest illuminated material produced by and for Mevlevi devotees. Many centuries later, they survive as a testament to the skill, creativity and devotion of the Sufi group.

Keywords: Sufism, Mevlevi, Manuscripts, Illumination

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WORKSHOP: From Enemies to Allies 4th Workshop

WORKSHOP: From Enemies to Allies 4th Workshop

Istanbul | Koç University Rumelifeneri Campus

26 - 27 September 2019, 09:30 - 17:00

British Institute at Ankara – Koç University – British Association for Turkish Area Studies presents:

From Enemies to Allies 4th Workshop:

Britain, Turkey and NATO 1945-1960.


This workshop will focus on the relationships between Britain, Turkey and NATO between 1945-1960, with talks from Professor Ilter Turan (Bilgi University), Sir David Logan (BIAA) and many others. 

  • Session 1: Britain, Turkey and the Western Alliance 1945-52
  • Session 2: Britain, Turkey and the Middle East 1952-58
  • Session 3: The dominant political personalities
  • Session 4: Britain, Turkey and Cyprus 1954-60
  • Session 5: Britain and Turkey after the Baghdad Pact

It will be held over two days at the Rumelifeneri Campus of Koç University, Sarıyer, Istanbul. A limited number of places are available. To register, please email Stephen Mitchell: mitchank@gmail.com.


 

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The Politics of Writing Art Histories

The Politics of Writing Art Histories

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

17 September 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Lecture by Ceren Özpınar, Lecturer, Programme of Art and Design, University of Brighton

Discussant: Belgin Turan Özkaya, Professor, Faculty of Architecture, Middle East Technical University

Summary of Event: This lecture will critically evaluate art history writing from Turkey by examining how women artists have been positioned through particular models and tropes since the 1960s. In order to demonstrate how art histories could be reshaped, it will explore the ways in which the actual encounters of artists take on further significance in their art. Through an elaborate reading of a few select artworks, the lecture will show how the intertwined positions of criticality allow for new visual epistemologies in art history.

Keywords: Art, Art History, Women Artists, Historiography

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LECTURE: Turkey’s Middle East and Wider Foreign Policies

LECTURE: Turkey’s Middle East and Wider Foreign Policies

London | Society of Antiquaries

16 May 2019 18:00 to 19:30

A BIAA London Lecture by Sir David Logan (BIAA Vice-President and former British Ambassador to Turkey).  

For decades Turkey had virtually no Middle East policy.  Ataturk had decreed that Turkey’s future lay with the secular West, not with the remains of the old Ottoman Empire or Iran.  Elsewhere, Turkey was bordered mainly by an old enemy, Russia, and a newer one, Greece.  This changed with the break-up of the Soviet Union; the rise of oil-rich Arab states; growing prosperity but also growing energy dependency on Russia and Iran; and – a novelty for Turkey – the assumption of power by a party which was not militantly secularist.  In recent years, Turkey has become embroiled in conflict in the Middle East, in particular in Syria.  Its relations with Europe and the United States are in flux.  Will Turkey become part of Middle Eastern turmoil rather than a bastion against it?

Keywords: Contemporary Turkey; Foreign Policy

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LECTURE: Headscarf-wearing fashion professionals: new roles and old challenges

LECTURE: Headscarf-wearing fashion professionals: new roles and old challenges

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

02 May 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA lecture by Magdalena Crăciun (Ph.D UCL), Lecturer in Anthropology at University of Bucharest.

Discussant: Besim Can Zırh (Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Middle East Technical University)

Summary of Event: The articulation of faith and fashion seems to many oxymoronic, generating confusion and provoking condemnation. Nevertheless, the Islamic fashion industry is thriving. In this lecture, based on her book Islam, Faith and Fashion, The Islamic Fashion Industry in Turkey (Bloomsbury 2017), anthropologist Magdalena Crăciun discusses entrepreneurship in Islamic fashion and its challenges in contemporary Turkey. She focuses extensively on the inherent contradictions in the experience of a new category of participants in this industry, namely headscarf-wearing fashion professionals. They are not only the most active and appreciated contributors to the development of a new aesthetics of modernity, but also the most exposed to the criticism that Islamic fashion engenders on conceptual, moral, and religious grounds.  


This event is part of the BIAA lecture series on Late Ottoman, Early Republican and Contemporary Turkish History. This year's series explores the theme 'Gender, Culture and Politics'.

Keywords: Anthropology of Fashion; Contemporary Turkey.

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LECTURE: Who’s Running UNESCO’s World Heritage Programme in Turkey?

LECTURE: Who’s Running UNESCO’s World Heritage Programme in Turkey?

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

17 April 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA Ankara Lecture by Julien Boucly (2018-19 ANAMED-BIAA fellow)

 

Since 2000, a World Heritage management framework has been established in Turkey. Central State institutions, including the Permanent Delegation of Turkey to UNESCO, the Turkish National Commission for UNESCO, as well as the World Heritage unit in the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, supervise this system. Nevertheless, they may not be the key characters in Turkey’s new investment in the UNESCO World Heritage programme.

Julien Boucly’s presentation discusses how and by whose initiative a World Heritage system emerged in Turkey. Regarding the UNESCO World Heritage programme, the central state is not running top-down policies, but rather tries to coordinate and control several stakeholders. 

Keywords: Cultural Heritage Management; UNESCO World Heritage Programme

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LECTURE: Ain't I a Migrant? Race, Slavery and Liberties in the Late Ottoman Empire

LECTURE: Ain't I a Migrant? Race, Slavery and Liberties in the Late Ottoman Empire

Ankara | The British Institute at Ankara, Wolfson Foundation Conference Room

03 April 2019 19:00 to 21:00

A BIAA lecture by Dr Ceyda Karamursel (Lecturer in History at SOAS, University of London).

Discussant: Owen Miller (assistant professor of History,  Bilkent University).

Following up on her London BIAA talk, Dr Ceyda Karamursel will present her work in Ankara as part of the BIAA lecture series on Late Ottoman, Early Republican and Contemporary Turkish History.

Summary of Event: In 1874, the customs officers at the Istanbul port seized a young black woman named Katerina, as she was disembarking the ship that brought her from Alexandria. She was held on the assumption that being a young, black woman on a ship destined for the biggest ‘human entrepôt’ in the region, she could not have been anything but a victim of slave traffickers. As they continued with her interrogation however, they found out that Katerina was not a “smuggled slave” as they thought she was, but a member and employee of the Greek Church, who came to Istanbul with the purpose of taking up employment. Puzzled by the young woman’s answers, the police shifted the focus of the interrogation from Katerina’s blackness to her Christian-ness, the core of the problem swiftly becoming apostasy than illegal trade in slaves. Taking Katerina’s multilayered case as its point of departure, this talk explores the gradated nature of liberties in the reform era Ottoman Empire.      


This event is part of the BIAA lecture series on Late Ottoman, Early Republican and Contemporary Turkish History. This year's series explores the theme 'Gender, Culture and Politics'.

Keywords: Ottoman History; Studies in Slavery; Gender Studies

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